Mr Bond, we expect you to resign…

Mr Bond. I’ve been expecting you… James Bond has survived 50 years of metal-teethed baddies, shark-infested pools and machine toting goons.  Sir John Bond survived HSBC, Vodafone and Xtrata. But yesterday the angry shareholders finally got their man. Anyone who has dealt with Sir John personally knows how charming, intelligent and urbane he can be. His conversation sweeps from high finance to high peaks – … Continue reading Mr Bond, we expect you to resign…

The FSA’s New Year hangover

Something big is happening in six weeks…and it’s nothing to do with a man in a red suit.  After the Christmas turkey’s been digested and New Year celebrations are a fading niggle, savers and investors are going to wake up on 1st Jan 2013 to an even bigger headache – Retail Distribution Review, or RDR. Once again the financial services industry has surpassed itself by … Continue reading The FSA’s New Year hangover

Keeping control of the message vs being accountable to customers

This morning my former colleague, now business editor at ITN, Laura Kuenssberg was on Twitter (@ITVLauraK) commenting on the financial results of Scottish and Southern Energy. Ordinarily, financial results are not that interesting outside of a business audience. However, when the company is one of the big six UK energy suppliers with 10 million customers across 3.5 million homes and businesses (and which makes a … Continue reading Keeping control of the message vs being accountable to customers

When does a breaking news story stop breaking?

Just before six am on Wednesday morning (UK time) Mitt Romney, the Republican former Governor of Massachusetts, took to a stage in Boston to concede defeat in the 2012 US Presidential election. Pictures from that event were carried live around the World with rolling news channels slapping a “Breaking News” banner across their screens reading “Obama wins US election”. Just after five pm that afternoon … Continue reading When does a breaking news story stop breaking?

Laying the archbishop

Congratulations to Anglicans worldwide, you have a new Archbishop of Canterbury. Justin Welby, who gets promoted from Archbishop of Durham, is an Eton-educated former oil executive, which means that in the UK the Government, the Capital and the Church are now run by old Etonians. Hands up who’s read any Gramsci? I was struck by the BBC’s reporting of the story. On the main Radio … Continue reading Laying the archbishop

US$3 billion cannot guarantee the Presidency of the United States, but it could buy an epic hog roast.

In 1758 at the apex of his campaign for the Virginia House of Burgesses, Colonel George Washington spent $149 and six shillings (2012: $8,000)  on a  “A hogshead and a barrel of punch, thirty-five gallons of wine, forty-three gallons of strong cider, and dinner for his friends.” These were great times when a political campaign was more like a boozy version of Masterchef, but obviously … Continue reading US$3 billion cannot guarantee the Presidency of the United States, but it could buy an epic hog roast.

Whatever happened to the writ?

By Jason Nisse Earlier this week I was asked by lawyers Addleshaw Goddard to contribute to an excellent seminar they were holding entitled “Your rights and their wrongs – when to challenge the media’s news gathering methods”.  Partner David Engel and managing associate Abigail Healey gave an in depth legal perspective on the law, the various codes of practice (PCC, Ofcom, BBC), and I followed up … Continue reading Whatever happened to the writ?