Local election hustings – bins, missed manifestoes and vendettas

I recently helped to organise a local election debate. They’re particularly unique experiences that people either love and wouldn’t miss for the world or – more usually – avoid like the plague. This means that the majority of people who attend already have strong feelings about one particular party, candidate or issue. These issues can range wildly, which makes the events unpredictable – part of … Continue reading Local election hustings – bins, missed manifestoes and vendettas

Are the Tories about to lose their Greater Manchester outpost?

In the North West all eyes are on Trafford. A third of the Council are up for election in May and there is a feeling that the Conservatives keeping control is by no means a done deal. For one thing, they currently have a very slim majority and it would only take a loss of two seats to make the local authority go to No … Continue reading Are the Tories about to lose their Greater Manchester outpost?

Facebook Corbyn

If you have any spare time on your hands and fancy getting involved in an online row with someone then the best way to start the ball rolling is to criticise Jeremy Corbyn. It’s really easy – just go on to Facebook and say something mean or uncharitable about the current leader of the Labour Party and sooner rather than later someone will have a … Continue reading Facebook Corbyn

Johnson, Lego and Dragons – how to communicate in a “Post-Truth” world

In the wake of the successful Leave campaign, many commentators have moaned about us being in a “Post Truth” society, where you can post a big lie (such as £350m a week for the NHS) and then admit that it’s a lie as soon as the ink is dry on your victory. The fact is “Post Truth” campaigning was not invented by Boris Johnson, Lynton … Continue reading Johnson, Lego and Dragons – how to communicate in a “Post-Truth” world

London after Boris – does a world class city need world class politicians?

  By Deborah Saw, Senior Partner, Newgate Communications As we squeeze ourselves onto London’s packed tube trains in the morning, attempt to walk on its crowded pavements and breathe in its polluted air Londoners might raise an ironic smile when they read of yet another survey that awards London world first rankings. Currently London is the top tourism destination for world travellers.[1]  The number one … Continue reading London after Boris – does a world class city need world class politicians?

Cameron favourite in “too close to call” election

David Cameron is likely to stay in Downing Street, according to the attendees at last night’s ‘The View from The Bridge’ debate on the General Election, held at Newgate Communications. After a lively and informed discussion led by the three speakers – Anne McElvoy (Public Policy Editor at The Economist), Peter Riddell (Director of the Institute for Government) and Melanie Baker (Senior UK Economist, Morgan … Continue reading Cameron favourite in “too close to call” election

Businesses Beware: Don’t get caught by new Electoral Commission rules on ‘Non-Party Campaigning’

With less than six months to go to one of the most uncertain general elections in decades, there is much at stake for the UK economy and business landscape. Many businesses and organisations will, naturally, want to comment on what they view as the important political and public policy issues – whether they concern taxation, public spending, red tape, infrastructure investment, immigration, our relationship with … Continue reading Businesses Beware: Don’t get caught by new Electoral Commission rules on ‘Non-Party Campaigning’

Tough choices await the victors in May’s council elections

After Eastleigh and the Budget, all eyes in Westminster are now focused on the outcome of May’s local government elections, as pundits and politicians alike try to size up the odds of the coalition Government clinging on to power in 2015. The three main party leaders have all launched their local election campaigns this week. While these elections are not at the forefront of the … Continue reading Tough choices await the victors in May’s council elections

US$3 billion cannot guarantee the Presidency of the United States, but it could buy an epic hog roast.

In 1758 at the apex of his campaign for the Virginia House of Burgesses, Colonel George Washington spent $149 and six shillings (2012: $8,000)  on a  “A hogshead and a barrel of punch, thirty-five gallons of wine, forty-three gallons of strong cider, and dinner for his friends.” These were great times when a political campaign was more like a boozy version of Masterchef, but obviously … Continue reading US$3 billion cannot guarantee the Presidency of the United States, but it could buy an epic hog roast.